Blog: Dude, I’m an Aspie.

Thoughts and illustrations on living with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Blog: http://www.dudeimanaspie.com/2012/04/light-it-up-blies.html

Karla’s ASD Perspective Page

Karla’s ASD Perspective Page  (Not Fighting Autism, working with it)

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Karlas-ASD-Page/155369821204141

Description: This site is dedicated to bringing together a collection of articulate, respectful and intelligent ASD Adults with parents/professionals and other Neurologically Typical caregivers and partners all with the goal of raising awareness of the shared cultures while creating resources and answers to help every ASD person THRIVE not just survive.

Milestones:

  • Founded Portland’s first ASD adult/teen mentor program\
  • Published in Temple Grandin’s latest book “Different Not Less” (see Chapter 4)
  • Awarded 2012 GRASP Distinguished Spectrumite Medal
  • Regular teacher to doctors, teachers and other professionals on ASD
  • Advocate for ASD Teens
  • Founded Portland’s first ASD adult/teen mentor program.

Left Brain/Right Brain

Left Brain/Right Brain first came into existence in 2003. Over the years it has changed its basic form a few times but its core content and interest has always been autism and the news, science – and bad science – associated with it.

Left Brain /Right Brain was started by Kevin Leitch. Over the years many people,  autistics, parents and professionals have contributed articles.

Left Brain /Right Brain is currently operated by Matt Carey,  a parent of an autistic child.  Professionally,  Mr.  Carey is an industrial researcher in computer hardware with over 100 scientific publications in high impact journals and numerous patents.  Mr. Carey has also presented a study at IMFAR and published a response reanalyzing autism administrative prevalence data from a previous study. Mr. Carey writes under the nickname “Sullivan”.

Website: http://leftbrainrightbrain.co.uk/

 

Living Life with Autism | Forbes Magazine

Alice G. Walton | Contributor

Part 1: Living Life With Autism: Has Anything Really Changed?

There’s so much talk of the origins of autism these days, it’s hard not to think of it as a childhood disorder. But we tend to forget that there is a fast growing number of adults living with autism in the country today. According to Autism Speaks, in the next decade alone, 500,000 children with autism will come of age. So we have to wonder, what lies in store for the young adults who will soon age out of the special education system? What kind of lives will they lead? Has public awareness of the disorder led to any real change?

read more

Part 2: Living Life With Autism II: Perspectives

Given the number of comments and emails generated by last month’s article, revisiting the discussion, from a different place, was important. The fact that adults with autism were not included in the original article was a shortcoming of the piece, but it was also an interesting barometer of the situation in the U.S. As Landon Bryce, an autistic educator, pointed out to me on the phone, “to publish an article without talking to people with autism…what were you thinking? On the other hand, it’s the norm!”

In this piece, John Scott Holman, Ari Ne’Eman, Bridget Allen, Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg, John Elder Robison, and Kassiane Sibley share their thoughts on how autistic adults and children make their ways in the world of neurotypical people, in education, work, and life. There are a lot of viewpoints included here, but a common thread might be that, beyond the issue of human rights alone, a different attitude towards autism might have economic, educational, and societal consequences that would affect a great many people – autistic and neurotypical alike. Of course, how to get there is up for grabs.

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Musings of an Aspie

Subtitle: One woman’s thoughts about life on the spectrum

Blog submenus:

  • Adult Diagnosis
  • Asperger’s and Marriage
  • Asperger’s and Motherhood
  • Aspergers and Autism Resources
  • Working Definitions
  • What and What

Blog: http://musingsofanaspie.com/