Navigating College Handbook

Leaving high school and going to college is complicated for everyone. But if you’re a student on the autism spectrum who is about to enter higher education for the first time, it might be a little bit more complicated for you.

Maybe you’re worried about getting accommodations, getting places on time, or dealing with sensory issues in a new environment. Maybe you could use some advice on how to stay healthy at school, handle dating and relationships, or talk to your friends and classmates about your disability. Maybe you want to talk to someone who’s already dealt with these issues. That’s where we come in.

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Navigating College
is an introduction to the college experience from those of us who’ve been there. The writers and contributors are Autistic adults, and we’re giving you the advice that we wish someone could have given us when we headed off to college. We wish we could sit down and have a chat with each of you, to share our experiences and answer your questions. But since we can’t teleport, and some of us have trouble meeting new people, this book is the next best thing…..”

Ari Ne’eman | President
The Autistic Self Advocacy Network

Website: http://www.navigatingcollege.org/
Download: PDF

Education Life: ABC’s of Accommodations

New York Times by Roger H. Martin

October 30, 2012

ACCORDING to the most recent government figures, about 11 percent of undergraduates, or over two million students, have a disability. Most have learning disabilities, like dyslexia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but 15 percent have an orthopedic or mobility impairment; 6 percent have a hearing impairment; and 3 percent are blind or visually impaired.

Although elementary and secondary schools are required by law to attempt to identify students with a disability and document their needs, in college it is the responsibility of students to identify themselves and request services.

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